Ocula at Frieze London 2014

Gilbert & George and Erwin Wurm

Chuck Close’s Kate Moss

Damien Hirst at White Cube

Cerith Wyn Evans at White Cube

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Ocula at Frieze London 2014

Eric Baudelaire, Everything is political (1), 1/7

Tracey Emin and Rachel Lehmann

Erin Fischl at Victoria Miro

Haegue Yang at Kukje Gallery

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Frieze London 2014

Thomas Demand and Tomás Saraceno at Esther Schipper, Berlin

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Simon Denny at Frieze London 2014

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Group exhibition Traitor and Tradition at ARNDT, Berlin
20 September 2014 - 18 October 2014

ARNDT Berlin is proud to present the group exhibition Traitor and Tradition in corporation with American curator Erin Gleeson. Artworks by Mit Jai Inn and Pinaree Sanpitak from Thailand will be shown, as well as works by Sopheap Pich and Svay Sareth from Cambodia. Erin Gleeson (*1979) has been looking at strands of conceptual art from countries in mainland Southeast Asia including Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Traitor and Tradition a thought borrowed from Lucy Lippard (arthistorian USA, *1937), who imagined that artists working in the minimalist/conceptual wave of sculpture in the 1960s must have intuitively sensed that the words ‘traitor’ and ‘tradition’ are from the same [latin] root.

The parallel line between conceptual art from Southeast Asia and North America consists on the one hand side of the conversion of industrial used everyday-objects: The minimalists and conceptual artists used mostly aluminum, steel or wood for their sculptures; The artist Pich (Cambodia, *1971, who exhibited at the dOCUMENTA(13) recently) forms abstract reliefs and sculptures with the regional material bamboo. The other parallel line is the Traitor and his betrayal on the traditional form, which is the prior aspect on a non-figurative art on canvas as well as in sculptures.  Both generations inspire with their materials everyday-associations within the viewer and transform them in an art context.

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TURNER PRIZE 2014: REVIEW

The Turner prize is 30 this year. By a fluke of timing – and taste – the annual show could not be less of a party. You spend most of the hours required to see it in the dark (three of the four contenders make long-form videos) trying to decide whether the work is elusive to a purpose, for aesthetic reasons, or just wilfully oblique and circuitous.



Berlin-based James Richards opens with a boot in the face; at least in my case. You might happen upon his black-and-white video just as the camera sinks tremulously beneath the surface of a pond, or a photograph of a nude woman flashes up, genitals censored by furious scratchings, or the moment where a flower is teasingly stroked across someone’s sphincter. Each element in this shifting collage of new and found footage gives way to the next in a constant flow of imagery that defers meaning, mysteriously elliptical, never reaching a conclusion – and so forth.

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Michael Wilkinson, Dresden Mirror 2, 2012, Etched mirror, wooden frame, oak shelf, digital print, cagoule storm flap and button, 54.5 x 58 x 3.6 inches, Image courtesy of Blum & Poe Gallery 

Mark Hagen A Parliament of Some Things at Almine Rech Gallery, London
13 October 2014 - 08 November 2014

Almine Rech Gallery London is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Mark Hagen’s third solo exhibition with the gallery and the artist’s first solo show in the United Kingdom. Entitled A Parliament of Some Things, the exhibition comprises entirely new paintings and sculptures.

Mark Hagen’s paintings are made by pushing black and white paint through lengths of rough burlap onto glass planes supporting sheets of wrinkled wrapping plastic, lengths of packing tape, geometric configurations of cut tile, etc. Once the paint dries, the fabric is pulled from this textured surface, taking its negative imprint on what will be its facing side. This is only a cursory overview of the process, but no matter how assiduously it is explained, it will remain baffling, and this is because these works, which we see frontally as all paintings are seen, were literally composed backwards. The artist can only predict the result to an extent—although increasingly more so over time—and this element of uncertainty is carried over to the beholder. From the point of reception, every visual effect is likewise subject to reversal, as if drawn through the hard shell of the skull, the moist folds of the brain, the charged chute of the optical nerve. To relate to vision in this embodied way is implicitly to divorce it from the phenomenal world. In other words, that which is blind in Hagen’s process is also blinding, although it has everything to do with how we actually see, with how much or little, based on our physical and mental predisposition.

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LOGICAL EMOTION: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM JAPAN IN SWITZERLAND


In the year 2014, Japan and Switzerland celebrate 150 years of diplomatic relations between them. To mark this occasion, Museum Haus Konstruktiv is collaborating with the Japan Foundation to realize the exhibition project “Logical Emotion – Contemporary Art from Japan”. On the basis of the constructivist-concrete and conceptual art that constitutes the focus of Museum Haus Konstruktiv’s content, director Sabine Schaschl and Kenjiro Hosaka from the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, are curating a comprehensive group exhibition of Japanese contemporary art. The presentation revolves around logic and its supposed counterpart: emotion. “Logical Emotion” shows a broad spectrum of artistic media: from painting to sculptural installation, video, photography and architecture, through to applied art and manga drawings; the exhibition integrates the most recent history of Japanese art and combines internationally renowned artists with emerging young artists. 

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Yee Sookyung, Translated Vase, 2008, ceramic trash, epoxy, and 24k gold leaf, variable dimensions, Image courtesy of Ota Fine Arts

Robin Rhode having been there at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong
17 September 2014 - 08 November 2014

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to present having been there, Robin Rhode’s debut exhibition in Hong Kong. Continuing the artist’s engagement with complex social and political issues, this exhibition also explores Rhode’s notions of permanence and ephemerality as seen through his unique marks and gestures. In addition to a selection of photographic works and wall drawings, Rhode will premiere a new animation created specifically for his Hong Kong exhibition. The artist will be present for an opening reception on September 17, 6:30-8PM.

Rhode, who was born in South Africa and is based in Berlin, engages a variety of visual forms including photography, performance, drawing, and stop-motion animation to create engaging and poignant narratives. Rhode’s experience as a member of one of the first post-apartheid generations in South Africa has been a major influence on his work, leading him to approach topics such as poverty and violence from a personal perspective. His work features imagery of everyday and consumer objects, such as paper clips, light bulbs, and champagne flutes, found in desolate urban settings as a reference to his upbringing, but also to broader universal ideas including desire, luxury, and the influx of consumerism into South African society. Working within the contexts of Johannesburg and Berlin—cities undergoing significant social and political changes—Rhode’s artworks embrace a vibrant spontaneity and are infused with both the language of the street and the dynamics of body-based performance art of the 1970s.

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ARTIST KACEY WONG ON HONG KONG’S SYMBOLS OF PROTEST

Through tear gas and the sweltering sun, umbrellas have been an indispensable tool for Occupy Central protesters in the streets — becoming a new symbol of protest for a more democratic Hong Kong.
As the civil disobedience movement entered a second day on Monday, logos for the “umbrella revolution” or “umbrella movement” began spreading on social media.
Kacey Wong, an artist and assistant professor at Polytechnic University, shared images of an umbrella in fiery red-orange, from the Resident Evil films, in an attempt to inspire other artists to come up with designs.
Another logo shared by netizen Ger Choi showed the outline of a white umbrella, above which hovered a yellow star in a halo of green and blue.

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Aaron Young, Rebel, 2011, Video, 1:30 minutes, variable dimensions, Image courtesy of Kukje Gallery
Peter Halley, Ancillary Control, Day-glo acrylic, and Roll-a-tex on canvas, variable dimensions, Image Courtesy of Art Plural

Martin Parr Martin Parr at Blindspot Gallery, Hong Kong
06 September 2014 - 01 November 2014

Blindspot  Gallery  is  delighted  to  present  British photographer  Martin  Parr’s  first  solo  exhibition  in Hong Kong, “Martin Parr”, a diverse showcase of the work  of  Parr  who  is  famous  for  his  satirical  and humourous  social  documentary  on modern  life.  The exhibition  spotlights  select works  from  his  recent Hong  Kong  project  (2013)  commissioned  by Blindspot  Gallery,  alongside  selections  from  two  of his iconic past series, The Last Resort  (1983 to 1985) and Luxury (1995 to present). An art book titled Hong Kong  Parr  will  be  co-published  by  Blindspot Gallery, riding on  the opening of  the artist’s debut solo show in Hong Kong.

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